Are there advantages of UK onshore natural gas?

This was originally posted at MyGridGB.  Part 2, titled “The inarguably perverse outcome of environmental opposition to UK onshore gas” will be up there shortly.

Although the concept of a dynamic level of carbon intensity in electricity is well known to readers of My Grid, natural gas has been left out of the equation, much the same as natural gas has been lumped, excuse the pun, alongside coal and oil as ‘just another fossil fuel’.

Natural gas has a wide range of Carbon Intensity (CI) even within the UK gas grid. The second part of this post will demonstrate how significant that is and how onshore natural gas in the UK is not a threat to emissions but the opposite:  A way forward to decarbonise, as much as possible, UK natural gas supply.  But first, we have to talk about gas in general and try to understand the antipathy some UK greens have against it.

Firstly as this chart from the International Energy Agency shows, natural gas is responsible for less than 20% of world carbon emissions from energy combustion. Natural gas is not perfect. But it’s not perfectly evil either. Continue reading Are there advantages of UK onshore natural gas?

UK onshore natural gas is the lowest carbon natural gas possible: Shop Local First

Sometime soon, the  UK will  import LNG produced from US shale gas.  Shale gas is over 60% of all US production, and over 90% of new wells use the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing.  It is no longer “unconventional” or “controversial” and is predicted to provide 70% of global natural gas production by 2040.

US LNG will have a carbon intensity  (CI) approaching, and possibly exceeding that of coal when used in electricity generation.  But gas from everywhere else – even as close as the UK North Sea- will also have a demonstrably higher CI.  In short,  the opposition of groups such as Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace and The Green Party to local production of UK onshore natural gas, contrary to what they strongly believe, causes significant  increases  in  CO2 emissions on a local, national and global basis. Continue reading UK onshore natural gas is the lowest carbon natural gas possible: Shop Local First

The End of Fracking. All over bar some shouting.

This may not be the last post at No Hot Air, but it will be close enough. Within the next few weeks I’ll be concentrating on London Local Energy, and I may or may not have a blog there.

Going through a new door is a good time to understand what has happened in the past. I’ve had a ringside seat at the greatest energy transformation since the light bulb.  I’ve been here talking about shale before anyone had ever heard of Josh Fox and Gasland.  I was here when the “conventional” industry said shale would never work: it was too expensive, the decline rates were too high, it was just a flash in the pan.

Continue reading The End of Fracking. All over bar some shouting.